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Scrapbooking Glossary & Definitions

This Scrapbooking Glossary is a general list based on my scrapbooking and swapping experiences. If I’m missing something, please feel free to let me know. Thanks!
Tammey

A B C D E F G H I J K L M-N-O P Q R S T-Z (TOP)

ABC ALBUM:
An album with one layout per letter of the alphabet. For example, an A page might be about a day you went out picking apples or an exciting Announcement. The B layout might be for Brothers, Babies, Barbies, BBQ etc

ACCESSORIES:
Items used to embellish or decorate your album or project.

ACETATE:
A form of acidic plastic that causes photo’s, paper and documents to deteriorate and fade over time. (TOP)

ACID /ACID-FREE:
Acids weaken the cellulose in paper, which leads to its break down, causing discoloration and disintegration. Products used near or touching your photos should be acid-free.

ACID MIGRATION:
When acidic materials/supplies come in physical contact with photos the acid may migrate from the original product onto other materials on the page, causing discoloration and disintegration. A deacidification spray should be used on acidic supplies or embellishments or scan and print a copy on acid-free paper for your albums placing the original in an acid-free pocket for the page. (TOP)

ADHESIVE:
Used to adhere photos, embellishments, and memorabilia to scrapbook pages. Typically this is a double-sided tape that sticks to the page AND the back of the item. Tombow Tape Runner (EASY and small), Adhesive Dispenser (VERY popular), Glue Dots (great for small embellishments like buttons or prima flowers), Glue Pen (for tiny pieces or very thin letter etc)

AF/LF:
Abbreviation for: acid-free/lignin-free indicating the items are free of acid that may disintegrate photos and lignin which will deteriorate and turn yellow over time. (TOP)

ALBUM:
An archival or photo-safe book to store your completed scrapbook pages in. There are many sizes and types to choose from.

ALTERED:
Altering an item (book, box, tictac container, etc) using embellishments and artistic creativity. In scrapbooking it’s when the creator takes an ordinary object like a die-cut and transforms it into a new, creative, unique embellishment. (TOP)

ARCHIVAL:
A term used to suggest that something has been determined acid and lignin free, photo safe, and is expected to be used for long term preservation.

B

BLEED
When leaking or transference or spreading of ink or paint occurs. (TOP)

BOM (BOOK OF ME)
Abbreviation for: Book of Me, a book by Angie Pedersen about creating a scrapbook all about your life.

BONE FOLDER:
A tool used to impress a fine line or crease onto a piece of paper or cardstock to make folding the paper much easier and provides a neater fold. Although called bone folders, they can also be made out of plastic. (TOP)

BORDERS:
Typically a decorative strip to enhance the top, bottom or side of the scrapbook page.

BRADS
These are similar to the office supply knows as split pins or paper fasteners. They work the same but are found in many different sizes, shapes, and colors and are very commonly used as a scrapbook item embellishment. A paper piercer is used to make a small hole and then the brad is pushed through and spread open in the back. (TOP)

BUFFERED / BUFFERING
Products that are buffered have had an alkaline substance added during manufacturing to make it acid-free. (Buffered paper prevents acid from moving from a photograph to paper).

BUTTON
Buttons come in many different shapes, styles, and colors and many are made specifically for scrapbooking that are thin, flat and can be attached with fibers, thread or glue. (TOP)

C

CARDSTOCK
Sturdy paper, available in a variety of weights for scrapbooking. (TOP)

CHALK:
Not regular children’s chalk, this is specially designed to be safe for Scrapbooking and used in similar paper arts. You can get it in in several forms: Chalk pallette, Ink Pads, Chalk Fluid Edger, Metallic Cream Chalk Set

CHALKING:
The art of using chalks to enhance your scrapbook pages. (TOP)

CHRONOLOGICAL
Arranging in order of date and time. Sorting photos and accompanying memorabilia based on when they occurred and then placing them in an album in that order.

COLLAGE
The placement of photos, memorabilia, and embellishments all on one page or medium (such as posterboard). This was a very common practice in the early days of scrapbooking. (TOP)

COLUZZLE:
A plastic tool used to guide the cutting of various shapes. You need to use a craft knife as the cutting instrument.

CORNERS (Page Corners):
These are large matted triangles decorated to embellish your scrapbook page. (TOP)

CORNER ROUNDER:
A punch that snips the corner from photos, paper, etc. There are also decorative corner rounding punches.

CROP (As in going to a crop)
A term used for a gathering of Scrapbookers to work on their albums, and page layout. ’A Crop can also be a formally hosted event with an expert who shares techniques, products, and information with the group.

CROP/CROPPING
To cut or trim a photograph is to crop it. (TOP)

Caution! Cut your photos with great care. Once they are cut they are permanently altered. To be safe, scan and/or save your old photos to someplace like Amazon Photos so the original isn’t lost. That way if you need them later, you have them! I know a great many scrappers that thought it very creative to cut their photos into shapes when they started scrapping, that greatly regret doing that now!

Crop-A-Dile
Amazing little eyelet and snap punch kit that makes setting these super easy! I purchased mine right after the first one came out and it’s still going strong! (TOP)

CUTTER
Machines that allow you to cut out shapes, letters, and designs from paper including cardstock. The cut products are then included in the album. Examples of cutters are Cricut Explore (see their inspiration page for ideas!), Wishblade by Xyron, Cameo

D

DAUBER:
Round miniature stamp pad which can be dabbed onto a stamp to apply ink or the tiny dauber balls are great with the chalks. (TOP)

DEACIDIFICATION:
The common term for a chemical treatment that removes acid in paper and lays down an alkaline buffer to counteract the further acid attack. Deacidification technically refers only to the removal of acid present at the time of treatment, not to the addition of a buffer. Deacidification increases the chemical stability of paper but it does not restore strength or flexibility to brittle paper.

DEACIDIFICATION SPRAY (Archival Mist)
A spray that neutralizes the acid in newspaper clippings, certificates, and other documents. (TOP)

DECO SQUARES:
Small decorative squares to embellish your scrapbooking page.

DIE CUT:
Shapes that are cut using a machine or manually with a punch. Die cuts are also available in packages from your local LSS. (TOP)

DIGITAL ALBUMS:
Scrapbooks that are created using software and then sent to be printed and bound into a coffee table style book. There are many options to creating a digital album, here are a few: Shutterfly.com, Snapfish.com, Walgreens.com, or software like The Printshop Pro which even imports FaceBook photos right into the software!

DRY BRUSHING:
Applying chalk or paint to a brush or sponge and removing most of it by wiping/dabbing it on a piece of paper or rag before using it. This prevents the paint from bleeding under the edges of a stencil and chalk from looking too dark. (TOP)

DRY EMBOSSING/DEBOSSING:
To make a raised image by pushing the paper up using a stylus from the backside creating a raised design. Also called blind embossing.

DOUBLE-MATTE (Double-Mount)
To place a photo on two background papers, each cut slightly larger than the one before it. (TOP)

E

EMBELLISHMENT / EMBELLISHED:
To add scrapbooking supplies that enhance and decorate your layout. (e.g. brads, chalk, ink, charms, ribbon, etc) (TOP)

EMBOSSED:
To create a raised design on paper, either by heating embossing powder laid on a stamped image or by using a stylus to trace a brass embossing template (also called dry embossing – see above). There are also embossing machines like the BigShot. Check out Pinterest or Amazon books for ideas.

EMBOSSING HEAT GUN:
An embossing heat gun is used to heat and adhere the embossing powder to the embossing ink. (TOP)

EMBOSSING INK:
An ink used for embossing and comes in an inkpad or pen. The embossing powder is applied to the embossing ink and then an embossing heat gun is used to heat and adhere to the powder. I’ve used VersaMark ink for this for over a decade! It’s awesome.

EMBOSSING POWDER:
Powder sprinkled, usually on stamped images, and heated to create raised edges. You can also apply embossing powder to a freshly printed image and heat. When sprinkling the embossing powder over the applied ink, it’s a good idea to have a tidy tray underneath to catch the extra powder. (TOP)

EYELETS:
A small metal embellishment with a hole in the middle which is added to a project by punching a hole in the paper (like with a Crop-A-Dile), pushing the eyelet through the hole, and then and hammering down the back of the eyelet to flatten it or using the Crop-A-Dile to set it.

F

FIBER (AKA Floss)
A colorful thread used to decorate scrapbook pages. It is NOT yarn. (TOP)

FLAMING:
Posting in anger or with great emotion against someone online. If you feel the need to say it, then say it to the person in their private email. Do NOT post to the board. Better yet take it to the owner.

FOCAL POINT:
The eye is naturally drawn to the focal point in an image. It is the element of a design where lines converge.

FONT:
The style of lettering. The term used for the different types of lettering available on the computer. (TOP)

G

GSD/ KNK/ SVG ETC
These are file types for the cutter machines. The various machines create varying file types. The files are created using the software and then the machine cuts it out. This setup works just like creating a document on your computer and sending it to your printer, except the machine cuts it out instead of printing it. (TOP)

H

HEAT GUN:
Also known as a thermal or embossing gun. A hobby tool that produces heat, but not air. It’s used primarily to emboss.
NOTE: There is a new type of heat gun on the market specifically made for DIY epoxy glitter and acrylic resin tumblers.

HERITAGE ALBUM
An album containing old and/or historic photos and memorabilia. (TOP)

I

INKING:
Applying ink to the edges of your scrapbooking item. You gently run the inkpad along the edge leaving a thin border of color.
NOTE: The ink pads I’ve found to make this the easiest are by ColorBox and are tiny wedge (or pie) shaped ink pads. I’ve seen the small, square ones by Bess, but never used them. (TOP)

J

JOURNALING:
The words you write in your scrapbook that may include captions, long descriptions, names, dates, poems or stories. Another way of saying journaling is that it’s the storytelling part of the page and is one of the most important parts of your scrapbook. Make sure you tell the who, what, when, where and how of your photos.

JOURNAL BOXES
Decorative, matted scrapbook item to write the story behind the photo or page you are working on. A very important part of scrapbooking. (TOP)

K

KLIC-N-KUT (KNK)
The Klic-N-Kut (KNK) was a very popular machine for creating and cutting paper elements for scrapbooking pages. (TOP)

L

LAYOUT:
A page design or the grouping of scrapbooking pages that go together. A layout can be one page; two or some are even a panoramic 4-page spread. It is simply your pages as you have them laid out with or without photos. (TOP)

LIGNIN:
A naturally occurring acid substance in wood that breaks down over time. Paper with lignin is not suitable for archival scrapbooking projects.

LSS:
L
ocal Scrapbooking Store like Hobby Lobby, Michaels or JoAnns (TOP)

M

MATTE:
Matting is a technique that allows you to enhance your photos by adding a border around the outside edges. The border is made from an acid-free paper that looks almost like a frame. To create a photo matte, simply cut paper 1/4″ larger than the photo and use photo safe tape to adhere the photo to the matte. (TOP)

NOTE: DOUBLE MATTE: Photo with two mattes, one slightly larger than the other.

MEMORABILIA:
Items/objects that are kept or stored because of their historical value. They may include newspaper articles, fliers, diplomas, certificates, drawings, awards, recognition, announcements or any other noteworthy documentation. (TOP)

MIXED MEDIA:
Using several types of media and styles at one time, which might include ink, paint, paper, stamping, and more depending on the artist/creator. (TOP)

MOSAIC:
Cutting something into smaller pieces and putting it together on the page.

MOUNTING SQUARES:
Small squares of double-sided adhesive. The same tape as found in tape runners, only these are tiny individual squares. (TOP)

P

PAGE PROTECTORS:
An important part of every album, these cover and protect the contents of the layout. They should be acid and PVC free and come in many types and sizes. Be sure to note what type you will need for the album you chose as there are top loading, side loading, and there are different types. (TOP)

PAPER PIECING:
Die cuts or punches put together to create an image for your scrapbook page. Or the art of cutting smaller pieces of paper and putting them together, much like a layers puzzle, to create more intricate and layered items.

PAPER TEARING:
A technique in scrapbooking where the paper is torn instead of cut with a trimmer or scissors which gives i a torn edge to create a unique texture. (TOP)

PAPER TRIMMER:
The tool used for cutting paper and photos.

PHOTO MATTS/FRAMES:
Cardstock or pattern paper is cut .25″ larger than the photo and the photo adheres to it.
For a double matte, a second complimenting piece .25″ larger than the first one is cut and adhered behind the first one. The edges could be inked. (TOP)

PHOTO SAFE:
Supplies, embellishments, and products considered to be of archival quality and will not degrade over time or cause destruction to the page elements. (TOP)

POEM OR QUOTE:
Locate a poem or quote that you like and write it out or print it on scrapbooking paper. The poem is then matted and embellished to add charm and color to the layout. (TOP)

pH LEVEL:
A measurement that tells a scrapbooker how acidic or basic something is. For scrapbooking, you want to use products with a pH level of 7 or above. (TOP)

pH TESTING PEN
A pen used to test the acidity of paper. The pen mark changes color depending on the level of acid present.

PHOTO ACTIVITY TEST (P.A.T.):
This test, created by the American National Standards Institute, determines if a product will damage photographs. If a product passes the P.A.T., it is safe to use with your photos. (TOP)

PHOTO CORNERS:
Paper corners with adhesive on the back used to stick photographs to a page by tucking the photo into the corners, removing the paper cover from the sticky back and placing. An excellent way to place photos without applying adhesive directly to the photograph. (TOP)

PHOTO SAFE:
Products that are considered safe to use with photos and are acid and lignin free. (TOP)

PIF – Pass It Forward:
Many online groups have a PIF board. This is a database located at the group site where person A posts an item they don’t want or have to offer (say a baby layout they got in a swap they will never use) and person B ‘snags’ that PIF. Person A mails it to Person B. Person B, after snagging the PIF, posts to the database with their PIF and so on. (TOP)

POST BOUND ALBUM:
Albums that are put together with small metal type posts. These albums are typically easily expandable. (TOP)

PUNCH:
Albums that are put together with small metal type posts. These albums are typically easily expandable. (TOP)

Q

QUILLING:
A technique where you roll strips of paper into various shapes. (TOP)

R

RAK – Random Act of Kindness
Most online scrapbooking groups have a database of members that sign up to participate in the monthly RAK. The members then randomly pick a person to send a small gift to. (TOP)

RED-EYE PEN:
Used to take the red-eye out of photographs. When available, remove red-eye before the photo is printed using the software. (TOP)

REPOSITIONABLE TAPE:
A type of adhesive that can be stuck on paper and pulled back up and re-stuck. (TOP)

RUBBER CEMENT:
An adhesive that is not safe for Scrapbooking. (TOP)

RUBBER STAMP:
A detailed, intricate design cut out of rubber and stuck to an acrylic block. A design is made by applying colored ink to the rubber and imprinting on paper. (TOP)

S

SERENDIPITY SQUARES:
Squares made by creating a torn collage of scraps on a background paper, then cutting it into squares and mounting on complimentary cardstock. (TOP)

SCRAPBOOKING:
The creative art of displaying your photos and memorabilia in an album and can incorporate journaling and embellishments. The primary purpose of scrapbooking is to preserve memories for future generations, but a secondary purpose often is to exercise your creativity as you display your memories in the beautiful and unique scrapbook. (TOP)

Introduction To Scrapbooking
Brief history, basic tools, and general information to get started scrapbooking. (TOP)

SCRAP LIFT
To use an idea for part or whole of a page layout you’ve seen someone else use. (TOP)

SELF HEALING MAT
A mat that maintains its form. Often used with die-cuts, cutter machines, and paper piecing work. (TOP)

SHABBY CHIC:
A style of scrapbooking that includes sanding, crumpling, and distressing paper to give an old and worn look to your page. (TOP)

SHAKER BOX:
A new trend (similar to a snow globe but without the water.) Use a die-cut and a piece cut out from a sheet protector. Seal in bits of confetti or small beads etc. (TOP)

SHEET PROTECTORS:
A protective page that your layout slides into. Also called Page Protectors and there are various types and sizes available. (TOP)

SKETCH:
Easy to follow sketch (template or map) showing where to place various page elements. (TOP)

SPIRAL-BOUND ALBUM:
An album with spiral wire binding. This album is not expandable. (TOP)

SPONGING:
The transfer of ink to paper using a small sponge (usually a cosmetic or craft sponge) in place of a brush. The ink is applied to the sponge and then the sponge is dabbed/tapped lightly onto a piece of paper leaving a series of small dots. A sponge with many holes, squeezed tightly while sponging will produce a beautiful lacy effect. (TOP)

STICKLES

Easy to apply liquid glitter. (Note – do not apply glitter onto or right next to photos as it may scratch them)

STYLUS:
A wood/plastic/metal tool with blunt, rounded ends used to de-boss paper (also known as a burnisher or a dry embossing tool). (TOP)

T

TAGS:
Decorative, themed matted shapes with ribbon or fiber on the top. Average Size: 2″ wide by 3″ tall. (TOP)

TEMPLATE:
Easy to follow sketch (map) showing where to place various page elements. (TOP)

THEME:
The overall idea, emphasis or theme of a page/scrapbook or swap. (TOP)

VELLUM:
A lightweight, translucent paper and comes in multiple options. In a pack of simple, vellum to print or draw OR as a pack of decorated paper, or as preprinted embellishments. (TOP)

WORKSHOP:
A class taught by an experienced scrapper. Participants bring photos and pages to work on and get advice from an instructor. (Can be online or off) (TOP)

Created by Tammey Brown (Scrapbooking Classes Yahoo Group 2008)


If you can think of related words to be included, please drop them in the comments below or send them to me in FB Messenger or an email. Thanks!!

Tammey

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